Jamberoo Farm House / Casey Brown Architecture

first_imgJamberoo Farm House / Casey Brown ArchitectureSave this projectSaveJamberoo Farm House / Casey Brown Architecture 2012 Year: Photographs “COPY” ArchDaily Houses “COPY” CopyHouses•Sydney, Australia Architects: Casey Brown Architecture Area Area of this architecture project photographs: Patrick Bingham-HallPhotographs: Patrick Bingham HallSave this picture!© Patrick Bingham-HallText description provided by the architects. Located on the edge of the coastal escarpment south of Sydney, the site enjoys beautiful views of rolling green hills and a distant panorama to the sea. The clients brief sought a new country residence with private guest accommodation and large entertaining areas. A microclimate of heavy rains, strong winds and western sun had to be addressed, coupled with the need for the new works to sit comfortably within the established character of a complex of existing buildings. Save this picture!© Patrick Bingham-HallThe design provides a new family house in the North West corner of this farm complex characterised by existing vernacular buildings including an old dairy, barns, sheds and cottages configured around an ancient Morton Bay Fig tree. Three gabled pavilions connected through a breezeway create a series of framed views through the building. Views to the North, West as well as the central courtyard to the South are captured while creating a series of private spaces and a large communal living/dining/kitchen. Carefully designed to add a contemporary layer of history to the place, the new building responds in shape, scale and proportion to its immediate surroundings.Save this picture!Ground Floor PlanExternal materials are taken from the existing buildings pallet but given a contemporary interpretation and include local field stone, vertical Blackbutt lining boards with cover battens left natural to fade to a grey colour and Colorbond roofs. Internally, Blackbutt floors, wall and ceiling linings reinforce a strong timber character. The main pavilion features a dramatic cathedral ceiling with exposed recycled hardwood timber posts, paired rafters and scissor trusses. Gradually, the pavilion becomes wider and higher towards the North giving the living area spectacular views of the surrounding landscape and coast in the distance. The scullery behind the open kitchen is built as a low ceiling room within the main pavilion. Large timber sliding doors open up the house to a wide wrap around curved veranda to the North West.Project gallerySee allShow lessRooms / Ando CorporationSelected ProjectsLandfill Reclaimation: Fresh Kills Park Develops as a Natural Coastal Buffer and Par…Architecture News Share Australia Save this picture!© Patrick Bingham-Hall+ 12 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/339387/jamberoo-farm-house-casey-brown-architecture Clipboard 2012 Area: 413 m² Area: 413 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/339387/jamberoo-farm-house-casey-brown-architecture Clipboard Projects Jamberoo Farm House / Casey Brown Architecture Year: CopyAbout this officeCasey Brown ArchitectureOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSydneyHousesAustraliaPublished on March 04, 2013Cite: “Jamberoo Farm House / Casey Brown Architecture” 04 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumPlasticsMitrexSolar SidingMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesCupa PizarrasCupaclad® 101 Random in Les PalmiersUrban ApplicationsIsland Exterior FabricatorsPublic Safety Answering Center II Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonConcrete Hardening – Hard-CemSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights – Ridgelight 25-40°Porcelain StonewareGrespaniaPorcelain Tiles – Coverlam ImperialWindowspanoramah!®ah! Vertical SlidingFastenersSchöckConcrete Façade Fasteners – Isolink®CarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Arena®CoatingsFormicaLaminate – ColorCore®2More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Joseph Mariathasan: China’s city cluster plan – a lesson for Europe?

first_imgHow should cities develop? Historically, the process has often been haphazard, driven by factors such as trade and population flows. As cities grow larger, the interactions between cities located close to each other start to become more important.Countries across Europe have seen this effect in regional groupings: for example, the four largest cities in the Netherlands (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht) form the Randstad, while the Rhine-Ruhr region in Germany consists of 11 cities with populations of more than 200,000.In China, the phenomenon of the ‘clustering’ of cities to form regional powerhouses is being taken to a whole new dimension, driven by two forces that European countries do not possess: a huge population and a highly centralised administration.Gary Smith, managing director at the Barings Investment Institute, has produced a fascinating paper outlining the goals and impact of China’s ambitious plans to set up 19 city clusters – expected to be home to 800m people – by 2030. Shanghai has a population of 26m people – and could have as many as 34m by 2035, according to StatistaThere are many reasons that could account for this. Suppliers located closer together can offer a more diverse and less expensive range of products, while common infrastructure and transportation framework costs can be shared. The larger and more diverse labour pool also helps firms and workers find a better match for one another, and innovations are shared more easily and diffused more quickly. Clusters of smaller cities may also be able to support a university or large factory that a single city may not be large enough to support.AgglomerationThere is, however, a competing force that Smith also describes: the “agglomeration shadow effects”, whereby competition between cities limits growth. In China, it appears that “borrowed size” benefits have been more powerful than “shadow effects” in China’s cluster cities, he says.The three leading clusters are Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, the Yangtze river delta cluster around Shanghai, and the Greater Bay Area encompassing Hong Kong, Shenzen, Macau and Guangzhou. The size of the populations is staggering. The numbers are larger than the populations of most European countries, with 130m in the Beijing cluster, 152m in the Yangtze river delta, and 65m in the Greater Bay area.As Smith points out, many other nations have urban regions of comparable scale to those in China, but they do not have governance coordination that is as centralised as in China. That has been key to China’s implementation of a successful national industrial policy, and the building out of extensive public infrastructure projects.By contrast, European countries struggle to implement long-term infrastructure projects and, arguably, any long-term developmental plans. If concentrations of urban activity produce synergies that drive growth, can concentrations of cities deliver bigger benefits? “The answer is an unequivocal ‘sometimes’,” says Smith.Rudiger Ahrend – head of the urban programme at the OECD’s directorate for public governance and territorial development – estimates that doubling a city’s population should boost productivity by 2-5%.center_img Source: Alex NeedhamA ‘maglev’ train coming out of Pudong International Airport, ShanghaiThe flip side to this is that there is also the significant potential in China for waste, with “white elephant” projects proliferating, driven by political reasons rather than economics. The maglev train from Pudong airport is a joy to travel in, but it is difficult to see how it could be profitable when it appears to be only half full and drops passengers off only in the outskirts of Shanghai.Barings’ Smith cites an OECD study that describes the Chengdu-Chongqing cluster in the centre of China as “forced”, with two largely independent cities separated by 300km of largely unoccupied and hilly land.Smith also focuses on the 55km link connecting Hong Kong to Macau and Zhuhai on the mainland, incorporating two artificial islands and a 7.7km tunnel that is hardly used – although Smith admits that traffic numbers will increase as regulations are eased. However, political objectives may have trumped any economic considerations in its construction.As Smith argues, it is difficult to see which other countries have the appetite and the administrative tools to replicate the policies that China has put in place. As a result, the Chinese experiment in creating mega-city clusters might turn out to be unique. But it may still have lessons for Europe and the US as a casebook study of the competing forces of synergies and agglomeration shadow effects when it comes to generating economic growth in regions.last_img read more