The Orange County Clerk of Courts may have money for you

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSOrange County Clerk of CourtsUnclaimed Checks Previous articleUpdating Breaking News: Stabbing victim in South Apopka identifiedNext articleDistrict recognizes July as Lakes Appreciation Month Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your comment! From the Orange County Clerk of Courts You may not be aware, but the Orange County Clerk’s Office may have money for you in the form of a check. Look at our unclaimed checks list at www.myorangeclerk.com. If you see your name on the list, you have until Sept. 1, 2019 to claim the money.The checks listed are those that were mailed, but never cashed; perhaps because the intended recipient moved away and did not leave a forwarding address, or put the check away and forgot about it.The list of nearly 5,000 checks includes uncashed jury checks, vendor payments, refunds, restitution, and cash bonds from as low as eleven cents to over $9,000. Whether you are an individual, business, or an organization, make sure to view the unclaimed checks list.“Our customers deserve to receive the money that is rightly theirs,” said Clerk of Courts Tiffany Moore Russell. “That is why every year we go above and beyond to spread the word about our unclaimed checks list.”The Clerk’s Office reminds customers who have restitution owed to them on a case in Orange County to make sure they keep our office updated on any address changes to ensure they receive any payments due to them.Please keep in mind, if you do not collect your money by Sept. 1st, Section 116.21 of Florida Statutes says it will be forfeited and deposited into the Clerk’s Fine and Forfeiture Fund.To search the unclaimed checks list, visit www.myorangeclerk.com. If you have searched the list and believe the Clerk’s Office is holding a check for which you have a claim, call 407-836-2200 for more information. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Behind the U.S. Senate vote against aid to Saudi Arabia’s war on Yemen

first_imgDec. 17 — The U.S. Senate held two votes on Dec. 13 that hold potential to diminish U.S. military aid to Saudi Arabia for the oil-rich kingdom’s war against the people of neighboring Yemen. By 56 to 41, the Republican-controlled Senate voted to limit presidential war powers. Then, the Senate approved a unanimous resolution to hold Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) personally responsible for the death of Jamal Khashoggi. The victim, a dissident but also reactionary Saudi, worked as a journalist for the Washington Post.The Senate votes may provide a hope of ending the war for the 28 million beleaguered people of Yemen, half of whom face imminent starvation. They do not, however, end U.S. aid. The votes signal a split in the U.S. ruling class and its government on how to pursue U.S. imperialist interests in the region.Since the U.S. achieved a dominant role in the region following World War II, taking over from the British Empire, Washington has used the Saudi monarchy as its local client state. The outrageous reactionary policies of the Saudi regime have never created any obstacle to U.S. support. Whether the monarchy was cutting off the hands of alleged thieves, brutalizing migrant workers or repressing women in a hundred ways, Washington and the U.S. oil corporations stood by the king.Battle inside U.S. ruling classWhat is different now is that there is an internal battle among U.S. rulers. The Donald Trump gang is especially close with the MBS regime, so a U.S. break with the crown prince also weakens Trump. In addition, the Saudi military offensive over three years has failed to dislodge the Houthis from controlling most of Yemen.There is nothing else exceptional about the current U.S. role as senior partner to the monarchy: For the past 70+ years both Democratic and Republican administrations considered the Saudi kings their junior partners. In 2015, the Barack Obama administration began backing the Saudi military intervention in Yemen, just as it ordered the direct intervention in Libya in 2011 and the ugly, dragged-out imperialist intervention against the Syrian government that same year.The Saudi monarchy aimed at supporting its own Yemeni puppet regime and at stopping a victory of the Ansar Allah or Houthi movement. The Houthis are considered allied to Iran. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the senators that weakening Iran was the goal in supporting the Saudi war. (New York Times, Dec. 14)Since 2015 the Pentagon has provided equipment and logistical support for the Saudi war on Yemen, including air refueling of Saudi bombers and fighters. This aid was essential to the Saudi war, which has directly killed thousands of Yemeni fighters and civilians and destroyed the local infrastructure. That destruction and a naval blockade have prevented food from reaching people in Houthis-controlled areas. Since that is most of the country, the war puts the lives of 14 million Yemenis at risk. In other words, though the U.S.’s Saudi clients are unable to win, their war leaves the U.S. responsible for this humanitarian catastrophe.It is perfectly legitimate for anti-war forces to try to take advantage of the split in the U.S. ruling class on this issue to stop the war against Yemen. But they need to do this without showing one iota of confidence in the Democratic Party or the Republican dissidents who voted against Trump.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Turkey: Show trials of journalists are a travesty of justice

first_img RSF_en News April 2, 2021 Find out more Organisation This week, ARTICLE 19 and Reporters Without Borders (RSF) are monitoring two trials of journalists in Turkey. News September 19, 2017 Turkey: Show trials of journalists are a travesty of justice News Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abuses Judicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of Europe Follow the news on Turkey to go further Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts April 28, 2021 Find out more On Monday 18 September they attended the first hearing in the trial of 30 journalists, columnists and staff working for Zaman newspaper, including Şahin Alpay, Ali Bulaç, Ahmet Alkan Turan and Mümtazer Türköne. Today, on Tuesday 19 September, they are attending the second hearing in the case of 17 journalists and columnists including Ahmet and Mehmet Altan. ARTICLE 19 and RSF call for the journalists to be released from pre-trial detention and for the charges to be dropped. In both trials, the defendants are accused of involvement in last year’s failed coup. They face charges of “attempting to overthrow the constitutional order through violence or force”, “attempting to overthrow or interfere with the work of the national assembly through violence or force” and “attempting to overthrow or interfere with the work of the government”. In the Zaman case, the defendants are also charged with membership of a terrorist organisation, which refers to the Gülen movement, the organisation the Turkish government blames for the coup attempt. In the Altans’ case, the defendants are charged with aiding a terrorist organisation without being a member, which carries the same sentence as membership. In both cases, the defendants face three aggravated life sentences. Most of them have already been in pre-trial detention for between 12 and 14 months. In neither case does the indictment include specific allegations of direct involvement in the coup itself or of incitement to violence. In the Zaman indictment, the prosecutor claims that the defendants sought to create a public perception favourable to the coup. The indictment does not establish clear and individualised evidence against the defendants. On the contrary, it states that the articles do not contain individual crime elements, but reflect the editorial policy of Zaman newspaper, which was allegedly determined by Fethullah Gülen, the religious leader of the Gülen movement. It is argued that this demonstrates they were part of a terrorist network. No attempt has been made in the indictment to explain how newspaper articles or columns constitute violence or force. In the Altans’ case, the indictment outlines a number of columns or articles written by the defendants which express views critical of the government, in addition to a television interview in which the prosecutor claims they gave subliminal messages in support of the coup. Apart from this, some circumstantial evidence about contact they had with alleged members of the Gülen movement is included. ARTICLE 19 and RSF, along with a number of other international human rights or press freedom organisations, monitored the first hearing of the Altans’ trial in June 2017. ARTICLE 19 submitted an expert opinion to the court, which outlined how the charges against the defendants do not comply with international standards on the right to freedom of expression. The opinion further concluded that these cases appear to be politically motivated. In addition to the groundless charges, ARTICLE 19 and RSF are concerned about undue pressure on human rights lawyers. Veysel Ok, the lead defence lawyer for Ahmet Altan and Şahin Alpay, is also on trial this week in a separate case where he is charged with “insulting Turkishness” and “insulting the judiciary” based on an interview he gave in 2015 where he criticised the Turkish justice system, stating that the judges lacked independence. Another human rights lawyer, Orhan Kemal Cengiz, is a defendant in the Zaman newspaper case. His name only appears once in the indictment and no evidence is cited against him. He was the lawyer representing the Zaman case at the Constitutional Court and also wrote columns for Today’s Zaman. Both cases represent show trials aimed at silencing dissent and alternative viewpoints, particularly criticism of the government. In both cases, ARTICLE 19 and RSF call for the journalists to be released and for the charges to be dropped in the absence of individualised evidence of involvement in an internationally recognised crime. Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor News TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abuses Judicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of Europe April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

‘Real Madrid waited too long to sign Hazard’

first_imgEden Hazard had an injury hit season for Real Madrid and is 29, leading some to conclude his €100m signing can already be called a mistake, with Los Blancos waiting too long to bring him to the Spanish capital.Advertisement Loading… Promoted ContentA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This Day2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A Vegan9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeLook At Something Beautiful That Wasn’t Made By A Human BeingTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldIncredible Discoveries That Puzzled The Whole World7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterThis Is Hachi, And He’s The Happiest Dog On InstagramWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Best Cars Of All Time They debated that exact point on ESPN, and Don Hutchinson said he thought that given the price tag, they probably should have moved a season or two earlier.Of course, Hutchinson concedes that this he can only say this with hindsight, and all the talking heads present agree that signing him was a no-brainer at the time.center_img There’s also just the plain fact that Chelsea weren’t willing to sell, until the Belgian was into the last 12 months of his contract, regardless of the player’s fluctuating desire to stay or go.He still has years left to show that he can make that fee worthwhile, but he will be as frustrated as anyone that he hasn’t been able to hit the ground running.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Read Also: Ronaldo’s girlfriend Georgina posts confusing baby messagelast_img read more