July 21 2004 Cosanti Foundation long time staff m

first_imgJuly 21, 2004Cosanti Foundation long time staff member Roger Tomalty is in Venice, Italy, to teach a Silt Cast Workshop at the IUAV School of Architecture. [Photo: Antonio Fragiacomo & text: Matteo Di Michele]Cosanti Foundation long time staff member Roger Tomalty is in Venice, Italy, to teach a Silt Cast Workshop at the IUAV School of Architecture. [Photo: Antonio Fragiacomo & text: Matteo Di Michele] [left photo] The IUAV School of Architecture in Venice is one of the most prestigious architecture schools in Italy. It has started an intensive summer program of innovative sessions with the intention of facilitating the expressive capacities of its students by putting a consistent amount of space and tools at their disposal. Important architects from all around the world were invited to participate. One of these courses, mandatory to graduate from the School, is about Paolo Soleri and Arcosanti. [right photo] Marco Felici introduces the students to Paolo Soleri’s LEAN ALTERNATIVE. [left photo: IUAV, right photo: Antonio Fragiacomo & text: Matteo Di Michele] The course has been organized and delivered by Architect Antonio Fragiacomo, Structural Engineer Marco Felici and Cosanti Research Associate Roger Tomalty, with the precious help of Daniela Bruni, Maurizio Ranzi (Roma Tre University), Sandra Suatoni (Istituto Italiano Per La Grafica), Lorenzo Alfieri, Robert Clyde and Arcosanti residents Mary Hoadley and Matteo Di Michele. [Photo: Antonio Fragiacomo & text: Matteo Di Michele]last_img read more

Rep Griffins plan to save taxpayer money on prison health care signed

first_img23May Rep. Griffin’s plan to save taxpayer money on prison health care signed into law Categories: Griffin News State Rep. Beth Griffin, right, attends a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist.State Rep. Beth Griffin’s plan to reduce the amount of public tax dollars spent on prison health care while continuing to protect public safety has been signed into law by the governor.Griffin, of Mattawan, said chronically ill and aging prisoners often have health care costs several times higher than the average inmate. It’s a growing concern in Michigan, where nearly one in four inmates is 50 or older with the average age continuing to rise. Health care already takes up 15 percent of the prison system’s budget, costing taxpayers roughly $300 million.“I’m always looking for ways to help our state government operate more efficiently and effectively,” Griffin said. “This is a responsible reform that saves taxpayer dollars without jeopardizing public safety in any way.”Griffin said the new law permits some inmates with severe and chronic physical or mental disabilities to complete their sentences at a medical facility rather than inside a prison, if approved by a parole board. It does not allow early release of inmates.The goal is to qualify inmates transferred to health care facilities for Medicaid, which would translate to a net savings for taxpayers.Only inmates classified by professionals as not posing a risk to public safety would be allowed to relocate. Prosecutors and victims could appeal decisions, and inmates convicted of first-degree murder, criminal sexual conduct in the first degree or any other crime resulting in a life sentence would automatically be ineligible for the program – meaning they stay behind bars.An initial projection from the Department of Corrections estimates roughly 20 to 40 prisoners could potentially be eligible for the program. The number could grow over time as the prison population ages.House Bills 4129-32, now Public Acts 13-16 of 2019, received overwhelming support in the House and Senate.###last_img read more

Ofcom the UK communications regulator has invite

first_imgOfcom, the UK communications regulator, has invited comments on measuring media plurality, following a request by the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport Jeremy Hunt.Hunt has requested that Ofcom assess how practical it would be to set limits on media ownership to protect plurality. He has also asked the regulator to recommend a framework for measuring plurality across different media.This follows an Ofcom report published at the end of last year on the public interest test on the proposed acquisition of BSkyB by News Corp, in which the regulator suggested that possible reform of the current framework around plurality may be required. Despite News Corp retracting its takeover proposition in the wake of the phone hacking scandal, the UK Parliament sees it as important to ensure an organisation’s control of the media does not make it able to influence opinions and set the political agenda.The findings will be provided to the Secretary of State and given as evidence to the Leveson Inquiry by June 2012 and Ofcom is now inviting comments on the questions it has been asked by Hunt, including what the options are for measuring media plurality across platforms; what the best approach might be; whether it is practical or advisable to set absolute limits on news market share; what factors could trigger a review of plurality in the absence of a merger, and how this might be monitored and by whom; whether a framework for measuring levels of plurality could or should include websites and if so which ones; and whether or how it should include the BBC.last_img read more