Greentree Real Estate Welcomes New Salesperson

first_imgGreentree Real Estate Welcomes New SalespersonMonkton, VT — Greentree Real Estate is delighted to welcome Katrina E. Roberts as their newest Realtor. Katrina joined the Greentree team this July bringing with her an extensive background in marketing, public relations, non-profit events and community outreach work. Most recently, Katrina was the Director of External Affairs for ECHO at the Leahy Center for Lake Champlain. She has also worked for the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation and the New England Culinary Institute. Katrina grew up in Louisiana and continued her education at Bentley College where she obtained a bachelors degree in marketing.Katrina lives in Monkton with her husband, Colby, and two young daughters. She can be reached at (802) 482-5232 ext.26 or katrina@vermontgreentree.com(link sends e-mail).Greentree Real Estate is located in Monkton, Vermont and has over 44 years of combined real estate experience concentrated in both Addison and Chittenden Counties. For more information, please visit www.vermontgreentree.com(link is external). ####last_img read more

Vermont Chamber releases Legislative Report Card

first_imgThe purpose of the Legislative Report Card is to clearly and succinctly depict the positions of Vermont’s 180 legislators on important business issues. The Vermont Chamber works closely with members of all political parties to champion legislation that will help businesses prosper and stay in Vermont.According to Duane Marsh, “We have found that many of our issues, the business communities, are the same issues facing all Vermonters – property taxes, roads and bridges, healthcare, and the cost of living within the state. With the current economic climate, it is even more important that business owners and all Vermonters understand how their legislators voted on the issues that affect their daily life.”www.vtchamber.com(link is external)Vermont Chamber of Commerce | Legislative Report Card .nolink {color: #3E3E3E; text-decoration: none; font-weight: normal} .digifront {color: #CCCCCC; text-decoration: none; font-size: 10px;} body, p, td, th, ul, li, form, i { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; } b {font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;} h2 { font-weight: bold; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #000000; } h3 { font-weight: bold; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #000000; } small { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; } input { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; } textarea { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; } .footertxt { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #3E3E3E; text-decoration: none; font-size: 10px; } select { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; } .preftxt { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #000000; text-decoration: none; font-size: 9px; } .digfront { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #CCCCCC; text-decoration: none; font-size: 10px; } .btn { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; background-color: #FFCC66; } .bb { font-weight: bold; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } a { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #3300CC; text-decoration: underline} .text1 { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #000000} .text2 { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #000000 } .text2_alt { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #006699; font-weight: bold} .text3 { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #FFFFFF; font-weight: normal} .text3reg { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #FFFFFF ; font-weight: normal} .text3bold { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #FFFFFF; font-weight: bold} .text3link { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #FFFF66; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: underline} .link1 { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #FF0000} .link2 { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #FF0000 } .link3 { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #3300CC; text-decoration: underline} .textinfo { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #336699} .photo_border { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #FFFFFF} .title { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 18px; font-weight: bold; color: #006666} .visitingtext { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #999966} .menu { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; color: #996600; text-decoration: underline} a:hover {color: #33cc00;}.InntopiaZ { z-index: 1; height: 122px;}.InntopiaForm { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; z-index: 1; font-size: 9px;}.InntopiaText { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 10px; font-weight: bold;}.InntopiaTitle { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #CCCC66; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-style: italic;}.InntopiaButton { font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; font-weight: bold; color: #FFFFFF; background-color: #336666;}0&&parent.frames.length) { d=parent.frames[n.substring(p+1)].document; n=n.substring(0,p);} if(!(x=d[n])&&d.all) x=d.all[n]; for (i=0;!x&&i Visiting Vermont, Welcome to Vermont Order our Free Seasonal Guide! Find Lodging and More! “Visiting For Kids” Seasonal Guide Traveler’s Links Visiting Vermont – Great Vermont Traditions Green Hotels in the Green Mountain State Summer 2008 Vermont Vacation eGuide Winter 2007/08 Vermont Vacation eGuide Order Guide Online Contact Us Winter Spring & Summer Fall Search Scrapbook Traveler’s Resources for Spring, Summer, Fall Traveler’s Resources for Winter Apply to be a Top Ten Event! Suggest An Eventlast_img read more

Vermont’s Fire Apparatus Magazine sold to PennWell

first_imgPennWell Corporation, a diversified global media and information company, announced today that it has acquired Tunbridge, Vermont-based Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment magazine and the website FireMagazine.com. Financial terms of the sale were not disclosed.Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment, founded in 1996 in Tunbridge, Vermont by C. Peter and Kathryn Jorgensen under the company name Fire Apparatus, LLC, is widely recognized as the leading source of information about fire apparatus-related products. Published monthly for a North American readership of 35,000, Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment caters to fire chiefs, purchasing and finance committees, trustees, commissioners and other fire professionals who buy trucks, tools, turnout gear and firefighting equipment. They read Fire Apparatus and the monthly Fire Apparatus eNewsletter for news and insight to make well-informed buying decisions.Noting that PennWell is the undisputed leader in providing information for the fire service as publisher of Fire Engineering magazine and owner of the FDIC (Fire Department Instructors Conference) trade show, PennWell President and Chief Executive Officer Robert F. Biolchini said, “PennWell is pleased to expand our fire portfolio with this outstanding publication and website, which provides us a vertical extension focused on equipment and apparatus. Since 1996 Kathryn Jorgensen and her late husband Peter Jorgensen have built their company based on editorial excellence and a strong industry reputation. Fire Apparatus offers a perfect fit with PennWell as we celebrate our own centennial anniversary this year.”Fire Apparatus, LLC President Kathryn Jorgensen will assist with the transition and expressed her confidence in PennWell as the best home for the future growth of the publication and website. “My goal in selling Fire Apparatus was to find a publisher who would continue and strengthen the magazine that my husband founded. I am very pleased that PennWell, which has an excellent reputation in the fire service and in providing information to multiple global markets, will do that,” she said.PennWell will manage the business from its headquarters in Tulsa under Lyle Hoyt, senior vice president responsible for PennWell’s Dental and Fire Groups. Current Fire Apparatus publisher and sales manager Bob Kelly and editor-in-chief Lyn Bixby will continue in those roles under PennWell.In addition to Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment magazine and website, PennWell’s fire-related businesses include Fire Engineering, which has published continuously since 1877 as the leading training magazine for the fire service, along with the more recently launched FireEngineering.com and Fire Engineering University. Founded in 1928, PennWell’s FDIC is the oldest and largest firefighter training show in the world and is held annually for 26,000 attendees and 817 exhibitors occupying 352,000 net square feet at the Indianapolis Convention Center. PennWell is launching a new event, TAK-Response Conference and Exhibition, which will be held September 14’16, 2010 in San Jose, California to provide real-time, threat-based training for law enforcement, fire service, EMS/medical, emergency nursing, homeland security and other disaster professionals. As part of its international expansion, PennWell will hold its first Fire Engineering India Conference & Exhibition in May 2011 in New Delhi, India.PennWell’s dedication to the fire service led to the creation of the Fire Engineering Courage and Valor Foundation following the tragic terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. on September 11, 2001. This independent, tax-free foundation will exist in perpetuity to annually bestow the Courage and Valor medal and a cash award to the firefighter (or his family, if deceased) who has most exemplified Courage and Valor in a fire rescue. Since 2002 the Courage and Valor award has been presented annually at FDIC in Indianapolis.About PennWellCelebrating its centennial in 2010, PennWell Corporation is a privately held and highly diversified business-to-business media and information company that provides quality content and integrated marketing solutions for the following industries in addition to fire and emergency services: Oil and gas, electric power generation and delivery, hydropower, renewable energy, water and wastewater treatment, waste management, electronics, semiconductor manufacturing, optoelectronics, fiberoptics, nanotechnology, aerospace and avionics, LEDS and lighting, and dental.Founded in 1910, PennWell publishes over 130 print and online magazines and newsletters, conducts 60 conferences and exhibitions on six continents, and has an extensive offering of books, maps, websites, research and database services. In addition to PennWell’s headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the Company has major offices in Nashua, New Hampshire; Houston, Texas; London, England; Mountain View, California; Fairlawn, New Jersey; Moscow, Russia, and Hong Kong, China. Source: PennWell Corporation On Friday August 20, 2010, 3:40 pmTULSA, Okla., Aug. 20, 2010 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

AAA offices nationwide driving tourists to Vermont

first_imgAs the fall foliage season shifts into high gear, AAA is working with Vermont’s tourism industry leaders to disseminate information nationwide through its travel offices. The resources will be used by AAA’s travel counselors to help direct motorists and encourage them to travel the Green Mountain State.Tom Williams, Regional Manager of AAA Northern New England, noted, ‘We have a golden opportunity to provide up-to-date, practical information to members across the country. In the great majority of areas hit by the storm, visitors will find roadways with smooth pavement and bright lines. It is our role to make sure that people who are interested in coming to Vermont get the information they need.’ In a communication sent earlier this week to all AAA offices in the United States, AAA states, ‘In late August, the State of Vermont made headlines across the nation as flood waters from Hurricane Irene caused major damage to the states highways and bridges. Within weeks after Irene, Vermont rebuilt at an unprecedented rate. Now 95% of Vermont roads are open, with final touches being made every day.’Vermont Department of Tourism & Marketing (VDTM) Deputy Commissioner Steve Cook works with the Vermont Chamber of Commerce and Ski Vermont on the ‘Foliage Force,’ a team which has been promoting Vermont’s vibrant foliage season in the wake of Irene. Cook noted, ‘The foliage season has begun, and all indications are that it will be as vibrant and beautiful as ever. We are delighted that AAA has taken a proactive role in informing people about Vermont, and our recovery from the storm. This is a testament to AAA’s confidence in our state, and the resilience of our tourism businesses.’The bulletin refers travel counselors to road repair resources provided by VTrans, as well as planning information supplied by VDTM, the Vermont Chamber of Commerce and Ski Vermont. It concludes that AAA Northern New England branch offices in Montpelier, Rutland and Williston are well prepared to help motorists navigate the state of Vermont. Vermont Dept of Travel and Tourism. 9.28.2011last_img read more

Canadian energy board okays Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

first_imgCanadian energy board okays Trans Mountain pipeline expansion FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Anchorage Daily News:The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion should be approved by the government of Canada, the country’s National Energy Board found Friday in a massive report.The project would likely harm endangered southern resident killer whales, increase greenhouse-gas emissions that worsen the impacts of climate warming, and could cause oil spills that would be damaging to the environment, the board found. However, the more-than-700-mile-long pipeline should be approved by the government anyway, the board found, because it is in Canada’s national interest.Final approval now is before the government of Canada, which has nationalized the project, and has 90 days for its consideration.Canada wants to expand the existing Trans Mountain pipeline in order to ship bitumen oil to Asia in hopes of gaining higher oil prices than its market in the U.S. A pipeline spur from the existing Trans Mountain pipeline, in service since the 1950s, brings bitumen directly to Washington refineries, where a variety of products, including gasoline and jet fuel, are produced.The expansion would nearly triple the amount of oil shipped from Edmonton, Alberta, to Burnaby, British Columbia, on the coast just outside downtown Vancouver. The $9.3 billion project would increase capacity to 890,000 barrels of bitumen oil a day, and increase tanker traffic in the Salish Sea from about six tankers per year to more than 400.The board imposed 156 conditions if the project is approved, intended to cover a range of impacts including emergency preparedness and response, consultation with affected indigenous communities, and pipeline safety and integrity. Most are the same conditions as from the board’s previous approval for the project in 2016. The Canadian Court of Appeals last August ordered the board to reconsider its approval, because it had inadequately considered effects on killer whales, and had inadequately consulted with First Nations.More: Despite harm to orcas, Canada should expand pipeline, energy board sayslast_img read more

Low crude prices prompt Teck Resources to write off C$910 million at Fort Hills oil sands operation

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Canadian diversified miner Teck Resources Ltd. swung to a net loss of C$891 million in the fourth quarter of 2019 from a year-ago net profit of C$433 million due to C$999 million in write-downs primarily related to the Fort Hills oil sands operation in Alberta.Teck said Feb. 20 that it declared a noncash impairment charge of C$910 million on Fort Hills amid lower market expectations for future oil prices. The company also booked write-downs of C$75 million on the Cardinal River coal mine, also in Alberta, due to low steelmaking coal prices and C$14 million on the Quebrada Blanca copper mine in Chile due to the short remaining life of the cathode operation.The company booked an EBITDA loss of C$755 million from positive EBITDA of C$1.15 billion a year ago. Revenues slipped to C$2.66 billion from C$3.25 billion.During the quarter, it reported lower output on a yearly basis for all products, with 6.7 million tonnes of steelmaking coal, 71,000 tonnes of copper, 149,000 tonnes of zinc in concentrate, 66,000 tonnes of refined zinc and 3.2 million barrels of bitumen.“We remain confident in the longer-term outlook for our major commodities, however, global economic uncertainty has had a significant negative effect on the prices for our products this year,” Teck said, adding that the new coronavirus outbreak may have a “material” impact on demand for its products and prices.For full-year 2019, Teck’s net profit slumped to C$339 million from C$3.11 billion as EBITDA plunged to C$2.48 billion from C$6.17 billion and revenues sagged to C$11.93 billion from C$12.56 billion.[Karl Decena]More ($): Teck in the red after nearly C$1B in impairment charges for Q4’19 Low crude prices prompt Teck Resources to write off C$910 million at Fort Hills oil sands operationlast_img read more

True Winter: Only in Tucker County, WV

first_imgRise and shine, gear up, hit the slopes (or trails), spend the day with the youthful side of Old Man Winter, then raise a pint to starry sky and toast True Winter—in Tucker County. Nestled on the tip-top of West Virginia with elevations jutting over 4,250 feet, and with an annual average snowfall of up to 180 inches, Tucker County is winter the way nature intended—wild, intense and invigorating.Canaan Valley Resort offers downhill skiing and boarding with trail ratings ranging from beginner to blow-your-mind. Cross country skiing and snowshoeing on miles of marked, ungroomed trails provide interaction with nature. And if you’re more snow angel than conqueror, you’ll love Canaan’s tubing park and ice skating arena with its own outdoor fireplace. With an expansive, untamed backcountry, White Grass Ski Touring Center is one of the premier touring centers in the east. Nordic centers provide tours, lessons, maps, backcountry information and equipment rental. Blackwater Falls State Park, with its six-story waterfall that is stunning whether flowing or frozen, offers over ten miles of trails, many groomed for cross country, and a quarter-mile sledding hill. Looking to extend mountain bike season year-round? The all-terrain fat bikes offered at Blackwater Bikes in Davis allow the biking enthusiasts to ride even with snow on the ground.pg.15 tline option coverAs great as they are, snow sports are just the beginning of Tucker’s True Winter experience. From fresh music performances and special events to legendary libation, you’ll be glad you played up an appetite and a thirst. There are plenty of local favorites to please the palate and warm the soul. The always-happening Purple Fiddle in Thomas offers great brews and live music and floorboards that never stop shaking. Whether you need the warmth of a gourmet coffee or the bracing bite of a Moscow Mule, the Tip Top Coffee Bar is always the right choice. Or sample some interesting brews at one of West Virginia’s largest full-scale microbrewery, Mountain State Brewing Company.0950In nearby Davis, an authentic taste of New York awaits at Sirianni’s Pizza Café, with mouthwatering pizza, pasta and sandwiches. As its name implies, Hellbender’s Burritos can conquer even the most serious appetite. Stop in to experience Tucker’s newest brewpub, Stumptown Ales, or grab a cold one at Blackwater Brewing Company to complete the true Tucker County pub crawl. Canaan Valley also offers several great dining choices. Enjoy casual dining in a pleasant atmosphere at White Grass Café, or savor a homemade meal at Amelia’s Restaurant. Big John’s Family Fixin’s offers up hardy fare and the area’s largest arcade. And full-service dining by the fireplace at Canaan Valley Resort is a good place to start, or continue, a tradition. Whether you’re staying the weekend or a week, lodging options are diverse and the hospitality is warm and inviting in Tucker County. Canaan Valley’s new 160-room lodge offers luxury and great views, while cozy Bed and Breakfasts offer intimacy and charm. Or choose a quaint rental cabin or accommodating house, many with slope convenient slope access. There’s winter, and there’s True Winter, only in Tucker County. Begin your authentic winter adventure at wvmountains.org or 888-975-SNOW. unnamedlast_img read more

Sweetwater Pulled Porter: This is Not a Bacon Milkshake

first_imgSocrates, the classical Greek philosopher, is credited with a lot of really insightful quotes, like “an unexamined life is not worth living,” and “the only true wisdom is knowing you know nothing.” And let’s not forget his classic, “be suspicious of combining two good things.” Okay, that wasn’t Socrates, that was actually my childhood friend Damian, but it’s as wise as anything the founder of western philosophy said. Growing up, we would go see the Allman Brothers every Fourth of July and Damian couldn’t understand why the Brothers insisted on playing on the holiday every year. The Fourth is already guaranteed to be a killer party, why throw another killer party on top of it? Why not play a show on the fifth and then we’d all have two awesome days in a row instead of jamming everything into a single day. It’s solid logic that I think even Socrates would appreciate. Christmas is great, and while it might be tempting to combine Christmas and Easter into the same day, with maybe a live broadcast of the Easter Bunny and Santa Claus going at it Greco-Roman style, I think we can all agree that it’s best to spread those two holidays out. There’s only so much fun you can have on a single day before it just becomes white noise. I tend to apply that same philosophy when it comes to beer, too. Beer is great and so are things like chocolate and bananas and Christmas trees, so it might be tempting to combine two or more great things into a single package. That’s how you get Jelly Bean IPAs and Old Bay Lagers. These beers sound like a great idea, but they rarely work out and I usually find myself wishing I could separate all of the ingredients so that I could enjoy a bowl of Jelly Beans next to my IPA. So I was suspicious when Sweetwater released Pulled Porter, a bacon smoked flavored beer that, at first glance, feels a little bit like watching Santa and the Easter Bunny wrestle. Too much of a good thing, maybe even a little sacrilegious. But this beer works. The Atlanta-based brewery partnered with Fox Brothers, arguably the best barbecue joint in the city to create the smoky, pork profile. Over three days, Fox Brothers smoked one ton of malt along with racks of bacon on their wood-burning smoker. Sweetwater used that malt to give this porter a smoky, bacony element that’s strong without being overwhelming. You get a hint of bacon, but it’s not like you’re drinking a bacon milkshake. Look for the beer in four packs this winter. And in case you’re wondering, I already applied for a trademark on the term “bacon milkshake.”Related:last_img read more

5 Favorite Waterfalls of the New River Gorge

first_imgWorn, ragged, a bit bruised, I had just struggled for two hours to cover a mere half-mile. I was accustomed to hiking off-trail along the base of the cliffs that rim the New River Gorge, but this stretch of cliff-line was more than I bargained for.I hugged the cliffs that towered above us, and with each step, the roar of water grew louder. Finally I was face-to-face with a stream of water taking a 70-foot leap off the top ledge of the New River Gorge. For pure drama, it was hard to beat. What’s more, this waterfall, rivaling the height of any waterfall in West Virginia and, to be sure, the tallest in the New River Gorge, was not on any trail map.This experience confirmed what I have learned over the last 26 years of living in southern West Virginia: when exploring the New River Gorge, both adventure and discovery come standard with every foray off the beaten path. These out-of-the-way waterfalls of the New River Gorge are hidden treasures just waiting to be discovered and admired. Here are five of my favorites, all concentrated within a one-mile radius of the National Park Service (NPS) Trailhead at Kaymoor Top near Fayetteville, and just a mile southeast of the world famous New River Gorge Bridge.Water wonderland: Butcher Branch Falls is one of many waterfalls nestled in the New River Gorge.Water wonderland: Butcher Branch Falls is one of many waterfalls nestled in the New River Gorge.Craig Branch Falls The tallest in the New River Gorge, Craig Branch can be reached from Kaymoor Miners Trail. As you turn to head directly downhill on some rock steps, you’ll parallel a small stream. On this stretch of the trail look for a faintly worn but distinguishable path to the right that crosses the little creek and heads toward the nearby cliffs. As you venture on this course, you truly step off the beaten path and commit yourself to the rugged realm of rock climbers. Forged by climbers who come to scale the awesome sandstone cliffs of the New River Gorge, there are many such unmarked paths running along the base of the cliffs. Thankfully, you don’t need to be a rock climber to hike them, but these cliff-hugging trails do demand that you watch your step and keep your wits.When picking your way through these difficult stretches, the chief rule of thumb is “hug the cliffs.” Even if staying close to the cliff means more ups and downs, resist the temptation to strike out on the level across boulder fields. Despite some hazards, you need not fear getting lost. The cliffs are unmistakable landmarks pointing the way both forward and back.Along the way, you’ll be rewarded with dazzling displays of the Endless Wall, a massive, vertical overhanging cliff of sandstone more than 120 feet high that rims the gorge for many miles upstream and down. After a few more rocky traverses, you’ll find yourself perched overlooking Upper Craig Branch Falls. Regardless of the difficulty of the journey, seeing the waterfall will lift your spirits.Upper Falls of Butcher Branch Opposite the Craig Branch Trail at the far end of the Kaymoor Top parking lot lies another pathway to discovery–the NPS Butcher Branch Trail. Though you don’t have to bushwhack to it, I consider the lovely Upper Falls of Butcher Branch to be off the beaten path because it receives little or no mention in tourist guides, maps in print or on the web, or in NPS literature.Here’s how to find it. From the Kaymoor Top Trailhead, take the Butcher Branch Trail. The trail runs along the top of the cliffs for a bit before gradually descending into a notch in the cliffs cut by Butcher Branch. After a switchback or two, the trail forks. The Butcher Branch Trail continues on the left fork and in a quarter mile connects to the NPS Long Point Trail. The right fork is labeled “Climber Access.” Unlike the way to Craig Branch, this is a trail. It leads to rock climbing areas beyond Butcher Branch. After several switchbacks that descend the cliff and a brief walk through the woods, the trail crosses Butcher Branch. Above the crossing, Butcher Branch rolls down a steep, irregular, rock face in a series of picturesque cascades and drops that are well worth a photograph or two. Linger as long as you please, for it’s only a half-mile hike back to the parking lot.The Middle Falls of Fern Creek The next two waterfalls, the Upper and Middle Falls of Fern Creek, lie on the opposite side of the gorge. From the Kaymoor Trailhead, return to Fayetteville, cross the New River Gorge Bridge on U.S. 19, and stop at the NPS Canyon Rim Visitor Center. When the leaves are off and the water is high, such as in springtime, the Middle Falls of Fern Creek can be spotted by those traveling north across the New River Bridge. It’s on the right-hand side about halfway down the canyon. The waterfall seems to leap out of the gorge. It’s quite a sight; one I’m sure thousands of travelers have viewed from afar. Yet, I’d wager that in a year’s time only a couple dozen ever see the falls up close.Here’s how to become one of those few. From the Visitor Center, turn right out of the parking lot and drive two-tenths of a mile. Make a very sharp right-hand turn, and proceed downhill one-tenth of a mile to a junction with the Fayette Station Road. Turn left and go three-tenths of a mile to a pull-out on the right-hand shoulder of the road. This is the trailhead parking.One path takes off from the shoulder of the road and heads straight downhill. But for an easier descent, take an old road that starts a few yards to the left. This is also a climber’s access trail, but it’s much easier to follow than the one to Craig Branch. You’ll cross a little stone bridge and pass a small, seasonal waterfall. Follow the path to the base of some sandstone cliffs, which are also a part of the Endless Wall. The trail is neither marked nor maintained, but it’s kept clear primarily by usage. Just remember to hug the cliffs whenever possible. The sandstone of the cliff face has been etched and sculptured by the slow-but-sure hand of Nature and are exquisitely stained in multiple tones of brown and red by the gentle brush strokes of weathering.After hugging the cliffs for about 0.8 miles, you can depart from the trail to do some serious bushwhacking to the Middle Falls of Fern Creek. If you’re hiking in early spring when trees are bare, you should be able to spot the waterfall for the first time. It’ll be downhill and to the left. At this point, I’ve scratched two arrows on a boulder on the ground pointing downhill. The hunt begins here. The slope drops about 400 vertical feet in a 500-foot horizontal run. That’s a little less than a 45-degree angle, which is, needless to say, steep. So be forewarned. Fortunately, there are no cliffs to scale or rhododendron thickets to negotiate. But the way is still tough.When you reach the falls, you’ll know why they can be seen from the New River Bridge. At the top of the falls, Fern Creek hits a stony ramp that launches it into the air and sends it streaming down to the boulders below. It’s rugged, raw, and breathtaking.High Drama at Upper Fern Creek Falls When you return to the trail at the foot of the cliffs, it’s only another 0.2 miles to the Upper Falls of Fern Creek. Just turn right and continue on the trail at the base of the cliffs. The waterfall announces itself with a roar that echoes off the rock walls as you approach it. My jaw dropped the first time I saw this waterfall. It sits center-stage in a stone amphitheater enclosed on three sides. It’s high drama for sure. Most of the time the falls are confined to a vertical cleft cut in the cliffs. But at high water, the falls make a spectacular plunge off the cliff top and into a pool in the middle of the amphitheater. It’s clearly one of the best sights in the New River Gorge. The backtrack to the trailhead is about a mile. You might be a bit foot-weary, but if you’ve caught the thrill of discovery in the New River Gorge, you’ll be pondering your next waterfall hunt.Lying in Wait: Wolf Creek Falls Wolf Creek is well named. It’s wild, intimidating, and untamed. It charges down the slopes of the New River Gorge like a wild animal. Not surprisingly, Wolf Creek Falls are rough and rugged. Fortunately, you don’t have to hike far to find them because they’re just off a paved road. But as if lying in wait, they are quite hidden from the road, and undoubtedly thousands of visitors to the gorge drive right past them unaware of the awesome waterfall just a few feet away.Starting from the trailhead to Fern Creek Falls, reverse direction and drive downhill. At about three-tenths of a mile, bear left at a junction. This puts you on Fayette Station Road, a one-way paved road that switchbacks its way down the north side of the New River Gorge and up the south side. As you ascend the south side, look for a trailhead in the middle of a very wide switchback. This is the trailhead parking for NPS Fayetteville Trail and Kaymoor Trail.Wolf Creek Falls is below the road and a little downstream from the trailhead parking. Walking downhill on the outside edge of the switchback, you’ll notice a few indistinct paths dropping down to the creek. These will lead to Wolf Creek Falls. The descent is steep, rocky, and choked with rhododendron. Wolf Creek Falls has a picturesque drop, massive boulders at the bottom, and a lovely, emerald-green plunge pool.Writer and photographer Ed Rehbein of Beckley, W.Va. is a co-author of West Virginia Waterfalls: The New River Gorge.MORE WATERFALLSlast_img read more

Colombia Approves Stock Market Merger With Peru, Chile

first_img Colombia on 5 November approved merging its stock market with those of neighboring Peru and Chile, which experts said will become the second-biggest stock market in Latin America after Brazil’s. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and his Economy Minister Juan Carlos Echeverry “signed the decree authorizing the merger,” a statement by the president’s office said. Representatives from the stock markets and central banks of the three nations will meet next week in Bogota to launch the new stock market, it added. A meeting of financial experts headed by Spain’s BBVA Bank said the new stock market will boost overall trading in the three countries anywhere from three to five times the current volume. “That would make this stock market the second-largest in Latin America after Brazil’s,” BBVA said in a statement. By Dialogo November 10, 2010last_img read more